Daily Productive Sharing 083 - 数字化地管理你的人际关系

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

如何有效地增强人际关系?投资人 Peter Boyce 使用了 Airtable 来管理自己的人际关系:

  1. 与人会面时,他会先用纸笔记录对方的要点,以及潜在的联系对象;

  2. 然后他会把上面的信息整理到自己的 Airtable 内,记录对方的生日/特长/领域等关键信息;

  3. 他定期会与对方联系(主要是电邮),并且记录下最近的联系时间;

  4. 他会评估一段关系的状态,比如是否 active;

  5. 他会记录共同联系人,或者潜在的共同联系人。

The more diverse his network, the more successful he would be.

Peter’s Airtable tracks everyone in his life. It breaks people down into circles—so he knows what worlds his contacts run in. It lists people by skill—so he can always make connections to people who might be able to help each other. It tracks everything from how often Peter wants to be in touch with a contact, to which event Peter has last invited them to.

The better and more extensive your connections are, the better your access to great investment opportunities, vital information, and – most important – high-quality people with great ideas and fantastic potential.

To me, life is about forming relationships and finding ways to be helpful to the people around you.

‘Last touch’ is how I keep a record of the last time I sent someone an email – I make sure to enter that manually, to try to nudge myself to keep up with all the contacts I need to make that way.

‘Active’ – do I consider my relationship with them to be currently active? Under ‘Cadence’ I record how often I should be chatting with this person – quarterly, weekly, or whatever. ‘Geo’ shows where they’re based.

Finally, under ‘Mutual’ I record the acquaintances and connections that I have in common with someone – it’s all part of seeing how networks overlap and complement each other.

At least once a week, usually on either Monday or Friday, I’ll tap into Airtable and make sure that I’ve taken steps to keep up our connection – I should be doing something that either supports them or engages them every week.

So now, anytime I'm in a meeting, I use a notebook to take notes.

Again – for me, people are the atomic units, so I don’t put other stuff in there: it’s simply about writing down people's names so I can take an action around them.

I loved The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, and this morning schedule is my ‘private victory’: doing exactly what I love: drinking coffee, reading books, and journaling. That's what I do from five to eight, every morning that I can.

The reason I have my calendar color-coded is so I can instantly scan any period of time and see whether I spent my time on the right things.\

I also prioritize books based on any thematic exploration I might be doing.

First, I try to wake up around 5 in the morning, and before I take my dog for his walk, I put my headphones on and hit play on an audiobook. I’ll listen to three hours of audiobooks at 2x speed – that’s six hours total – from 5 to 8 every morning that I can—though I’m not perfect at this.

Second, I carry a paper book with me pretty much everywhere I go. You’d be surprised at how much reading you can get in when you do bits and pieces like that all day.

Finally: I always read before I go to sleep.

Peter Boyce is a People Person

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How do you effectively enhance your relationships? Investor Peter Boyce uses Airtable to manage his relationships.

  1. When meeting with someone, he will first write down with a pen and paper the key information and potential contacts of the person.

  2. He will then organize the above information into his Airtable, recording key information such as the person's birthday/specialties/field.

  3. He will be in regular contact with the other person (primarily by email) and keep a record of the most recent contact time.

  4. He will assess the status of a relationship, whether active or not.

  5. He will keep a record of common contacts, or potential common contacts.

The more diverse his network, the more successful he would be.

Peter’s Airtable tracks everyone in his life. It breaks people down into circles—so he knows what worlds his contacts run in. It lists people by skill—so he can always make connections to people who might be able to help each other. It tracks everything from how often Peter wants to be in touch with a contact, to which event Peter has last invited them to.

The better and more extensive your connections are, the better your access to great investment opportunities, vital information, and – most important – high-quality people with great ideas and fantastic potential.

To me, life is about forming relationships and finding ways to be helpful to the people around you.

‘Last touch’ is how I keep a record of the last time I sent someone an email – I make sure to enter that manually, to try to nudge myself to keep up with all the contacts I need to make that way.

‘Active’ – do I consider my relationship with them to be currently active? Under ‘Cadence’ I record how often I should be chatting with this person – quarterly, weekly, or whatever. ‘Geo’ shows where they’re based.

Finally, under ‘Mutual’ I record the acquaintances and connections that I have in common with someone – it’s all part of seeing how networks overlap and complement each other.

At least once a week, usually on either Monday or Friday, I’ll tap into Airtable and make sure that I’ve taken steps to keep up our connection – I should be doing something that either supports them or engages them every week.

So now, anytime I'm in a meeting, I use a notebook to take notes.

Again – for me, people are the atomic units, so I don’t put other stuff in there: it’s simply about writing down people's names so I can take an action around them.

I loved The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, and this morning schedule is my ‘private victory’: doing exactly what I love: drinking coffee, reading books, and journaling. That's what I do from five to eight, every morning that I can.

The reason I have my calendar color-coded is so I can instantly scan any period of time and see whether I spent my time on the right things.\

I also prioritize books based on any thematic exploration I might be doing.

First, I try to wake up around 5 in the morning, and before I take my dog for his walk, I put my headphones on and hit play on an audiobook. I’ll listen to three hours of audiobooks at 2x speed – that’s six hours total – from 5 to 8 every morning that I can—though I’m not perfect at this.

Second, I carry a paper book with me pretty much everywhere I go. You’d be surprised at how much reading you can get in when you do bits and pieces like that all day.

Finally: I always read before I go to sleep.

Peter Boyce is a People Person

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