Daily Productive Sharing 082 - 搭建智能笔记系统

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

上周我们介绍了 Nat Eliason 使用 RoamResearch 来构建自己的读书笔记系统,今天的文章介绍了他使用 Smart Notes 的方法。即使你不使用昂贵的 RoamResearch,也可以在目前的工具上搭建这套系统。这一系统一共有五步:

  1. Get a good notebook for taking notes as you read

  2. Handwrite ideas as you have them while reading, and reference where they came from

  3. Upload your highlights and ideas once you finish a book

  4. File those ideas in their most useful contexts

  5. Use those ideas to create new works!

Daily Productive Sharing 077 - 20201201

Daily Productive Sharing 043 - 20201019

The core idea of Smart Notes is that purely extracting highlights is generally a waste of time. A highlight speaks to you when you take it, but if you don't capture the idea that the highlight gave you, you're unlikely to remember the importance of that highlight later. Or even if you do feel some spark when revisiting the highlight, it might be a different interpretation.

But why physical notes? When you have to write your notes by hand, you'll be a bit more thoughtful with them and be forced to put things in your own words. With typing, it's easier to just re-type what you're reading (or worse, copy & paste), and not capture the whole context of the idea.

As you're reading, write down anything that comes to mind from the book and where you found it. It could be your own interpretation of a passage, or it could be some other seemingly random idea that the book sparked. Capture it in your notebook as a quick "fleeting note" that you can expand on later.

Don't be tempted to mark things that "seem" important, only save the ones that speak to you.

Once I finish a book, I'll upload all of my notes from it to Roam. There are two kinds of notes to upload:

  1. References, the highlights that I got ideas from and want to extract

  1. Ideas, the thoughts that I had while reading the book

One of the core ideas of Smart Notes is to file information based on the context you want to rediscover it in, not based on the context you found it in.

Tagging the idea with its relevant contexts helps, but by moving an idea to its primary context you can better organize it within that context by nesting it under other topics or headings.

This is the true power of the Smart Notes system: since you're constantly capturing the ideas that you're getting from disparate sources and organizing them in their most important contexts, you can quickly develop ideas for new articles, books, scripts, whatever it is you create from your ideas.

How to Take Smart Notes: A Step-by-Step Guide

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Last week we covered Nat Eliason's use of RoamResearch to build his own reading notes system, and today's post explains his approach with Smart Notes. Even if you don't use the expensive RoamResearch, you can build this system on your current tool set. There are five steps in this system.

  1. Get a good notebook for taking notes as you read

  2. Handwrite ideas as you have them while reading, and reference where they came from

  3. Upload your highlights and ideas once you finish a book

  4. File those ideas in their most useful contexts

  5. Use those ideas to create new works!

Daily Productive Sharing 077 - 20201201

Daily Productive Sharing 043 - 20201019

The core idea of Smart Notes is that purely extracting highlights is generally a waste of time. A highlight speaks to you when you take it, but if you don't capture the idea that the highlight gave you, you're unlikely to remember the importance of that highlight later. Or even if you do feel some spark when revisiting the highlight, it might be a different interpretation.

But why physical notes? When you have to write your notes by hand, you'll be a bit more thoughtful with them and be forced to put things in your own words. With typing, it's easier to just re-type what you're reading (or worse, copy & paste), and not capture the whole context of the idea.

As you're reading, write down anything that comes to mind from the book and where you found it. It could be your own interpretation of a passage, or it could be some other seemingly random idea that the book sparked. Capture it in your notebook as a quick "fleeting note" that you can expand on later.

Don't be tempted to mark things that "seem" important, only save the ones that speak to you.

Once I finish a book, I'll upload all of my notes from it to Roam. There are two kinds of notes to upload:

  1. References, the highlights that I got ideas from and want to extract

  1. Ideas, the thoughts that I had while reading the book

One of the core ideas of Smart Notes is to file information based on the context you want to rediscover it in, not based on the context you found it in.

Tagging the idea with its relevant contexts helps, but by moving an idea to its primary context you can better organize it within that context by nesting it under other topics or headings.

This is the true power of the Smart Notes system: since you're constantly capturing the ideas that you're getting from disparate sources and organizing them in their most important contexts, you can quickly develop ideas for new articles, books, scripts, whatever it is you create from your ideas.

How to Take Smart Notes: A Step-by-Step Guide

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