Daily Productive Sharing 076 - 他可能是目前世界上最有名的医生

One helpful tip per day:)

(The English version follows)

Ali Abdaal 可能是最知名的生产力 Youtuber 了,他的视频也被我们多次推荐。

Daily Productive Sharing 003 - 20200903

Daily Productive Sharing 022 - 20200924

Daily Productive Sharing 043 - 20201019

在这篇文字访谈中,Ali 介绍了自己制作视频的工作流,自己管理时间的秘笈,自己管理读书笔记的方法。总之这是一篇信息量超级大的访谈,比如他提到自己的视频平均留存率大概在 10-15% 之间,比如他会针对不同的观众设计不同的视频风格。如果你也在做类似的内容创作,那么这篇访谈还会告诉你如何制作更棒的内容。

In fact, Ali is someone who says, “I worship at the altar of productivity” — and therein lies the secret to his success: he combines his lifelong fascination with productivity and workflows with a medical scientist’s patience for clinical trials and close observation.

Every YouTube video I publish begins with an idea – and as soon as I get an idea, it goes straight into Notion.

But in general, the plan is that we release a video every Tuesday, Friday, and Sunday.

Of all the videos we do, however, the most important of those videos is Tuesday’s sponsored video.

Sponsored videos are really the only hard deadlines I have – they’re a vitally important part of our revenue. Everything else I do I can be flexible about.

Under ‘Video Intention’, I classify what type of video it is. When it comes down to it, there are only three types of video on YouTube: videos designed to be ‘Discoverable’ to a new audience, ‘Community’ content to appeal to your existing audience, and ‘Sales’ videos to get someone to stop surfing around YouTube and click into something else.

The aim with Discoverable videos is simply to get the audience to watch until the end, and then get them to stick around to watch another video after that. In ranking videos and matching them for recommendation to potential viewers, the YouTube algorithm rewards video watch time and overall session watch time.

For me, just knowing the video is Discoverable already puts me into the mindset that I need to make the video snappy – I need to present myself well, and not ramble too much. I also need to avoid inside jokes that only my existing viewers would get, because I have to appeal to any new audience this video might draw.

On YouTube, the title and thumbnail of a video are so important that you want to think about them before you even start shooting. Usually I insist that we generate at least ten to twenty potential titles for every single video.

I know it all sounds a bit cringey and clickbaity, but the point is that finding the right thumbnail builds excitement and intrigue, and most importantly, attracts clicks.

In the first ten seconds of a video, you really have to deliver on the premise in the title, so viewers know the video is worth watching.

It’s vital that you build a narrative – and set it up quickly – which is why my Notion template includes a series of seven questions that help us do just that.

One of the things you have to keep in mind when you’re making videos for YouTube is that while the content must be enjoyable and relevant to the viewer, ultimately the metrics of success are structured around how much of the video you get them to watch.

As the video continues, there’s a sort of slow burn of viewer attrition. I normally end up at between 10% and 15% of viewers who will actually watch through to the end.

At the end of the video, you want to point the viewers who are still watching towards yet another video or playlist to get them to continue watching.

I just want to squeeze as much as possible out of the minutes and hours I spent consuming media.

But I was really surprised to see Parkinson’s Law in action in my own life: it turns out that I can get just as much done on a random evening as I can in a whole day, if I give myself the whole day to do it.

The Double Life of Productivity’s Most Famous Doctor

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Ali Abdaal is probably best known as a productivity Youtuber, and his videos have been recommended by us many times.

Daily Productive Sharing 003 - 20200903

Daily Productive Sharing 022 - 20200924

Daily Productive Sharing 043 - 20201019

In this text interview, Ali describes his workflow for making videos, his tips for managing time, and his method for managing reading notes. All in all it's a super informative interview, for example, he mentions that his average video retention rate is somewhere between 10-15%, and he would design different video styles for different audiences. If you're doing similar content creation, this interview will also show you how to make even better content.

In fact, Ali is someone who says, “I worship at the altar of productivity” — and therein lies the secret to his success: he combines his lifelong fascination with productivity and workflows with a medical scientist’s patience for clinical trials and close observation.

Every YouTube video I publish begins with an idea – and as soon as I get an idea, it goes straight into Notion.

But in general, the plan is that we release a video every Tuesday, Friday, and Sunday.

Of all the videos we do, however, the most important of those videos is Tuesday’s sponsored video.

Sponsored videos are really the only hard deadlines I have – they’re a vitally important part of our revenue. Everything else I do I can be flexible about.

Under ‘Video Intention’, I classify what type of video it is. When it comes down to it, there are only three types of video on YouTube: videos designed to be ‘Discoverable’ to a new audience, ‘Community’ content to appeal to your existing audience, and ‘Sales’ videos to get someone to stop surfing around YouTube and click into something else.

The aim with Discoverable videos is simply to get the audience to watch until the end, and then get them to stick around to watch another video after that. In ranking videos and matching them for recommendation to potential viewers, the YouTube algorithm rewards video watch time and overall session watch time.

For me, just knowing the video is Discoverable already puts me into the mindset that I need to make the video snappy – I need to present myself well, and not ramble too much. I also need to avoid inside jokes that only my existing viewers would get, because I have to appeal to any new audience this video might draw.

On YouTube, the title and thumbnail of a video are so important that you want to think about them before you even start shooting. Usually I insist that we generate at least ten to twenty potential titles for every single video.

I know it all sounds a bit cringey and clickbaity, but the point is that finding the right thumbnail builds excitement and intrigue, and most importantly, attracts clicks.

In the first ten seconds of a video, you really have to deliver on the premise in the title, so viewers know the video is worth watching.

It’s vital that you build a narrative – and set it up quickly – which is why my Notion template includes a series of seven questions that help us do just that.

One of the things you have to keep in mind when you’re making videos for YouTube is that while the content must be enjoyable and relevant to the viewer, ultimately the metrics of success are structured around how much of the video you get them to watch.

As the video continues, there’s a sort of slow burn of viewer attrition. I normally end up at between 10% and 15% of viewers who will actually watch through to the end.

At the end of the video, you want to point the viewers who are still watching towards yet another video or playlist to get them to continue watching.

I just want to squeeze as much as possible out of the minutes and hours I spent consuming media.

But I was really surprised to see Parkinson’s Law in action in my own life: it turns out that I can get just as much done on a random evening as I can in a whole day, if I give myself the whole day to do it.

The Double Life of Productivity’s Most Famous Doctor

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